Venting A Bathroom

Venting A Bathroom

Vanity Venting In new construction, the simplest way to vent a bathroom group is usually to install a single vertical vent pipe behind the bathroom sink. This works as long as all the plumbing fixtures connect to the main drain line in the floor within 6 to 10 lineal feet of the sink drain. Local building codes regulate the maximum connection distance of plumbing fixtures for venting purposes. Because a standard sink drain exits through the wall behind the sink, it sits higher than the tub, shower and commode drains, making it an optimal spot for a vent. When a vent that connects one bathroom fixture serves as the vent for other fixtures, it’s called “wet venting.” Because drainpipe size, fixture configuration and distance all play a role in successful venting, only an experienced plumber should design the waste and vent layout.
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Venting A Bathroom

In new construction, the simplest way to vent a bathroom group is usually to install a single vertical vent pipe behind the bathroom sink. This works as long as all the plumbing fixtures connect to the main drain line in the floor within 6 to 10 lineal feet of the sink drain. Local building codes regulate the maximum connection distance of plumbing fixtures for venting purposes. Because a standard sink drain exits through the wall behind the sink, it sits higher than the tub, shower and commode drains, making it an optimal spot for a vent. When a vent that connects one bathroom fixture serves as the vent for other fixtures, it’s called “wet venting.” Because drainpipe size, fixture configuration and distance all play a role in successful venting, only an experienced plumber should design the waste and vent layout.
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Venting A Bathroom

Venting Basics The old-fashioned method of venting featured a separate vent pipe for every fixture but that led to multiple vent pipes exiting the roof. Today, plumbers combine vents, and even a home with four or more bathrooms typically has only one main vent-and-soil stack that exits the roof at the top and curves to form the horizontal sewer drain at the bottom. A good drain, waste and vent layout takes bathroom, laundry room and kitchen configuration into consideration when planning where the main vent-and-soil stack is located and how each drain and vent will connect. Drainpipes all slope downward and tie into the stack, while vent pipes extend upward and meet the stack higher on the line, often in the attic. The basic rule is that a vent must not connect to the stack lower on the stack than a drain connection.
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Venting A Bathroom

Tom July 10, 2016 at 10:46 am # I have a soffit ventilated bathroom exhaust fan that doesn’t seem to be venting the moist air out of the bathroom. I am having problems with paint peeling in the bathroom. The distance from the fan to where the vent pipe attaches to the soffit is about 12 feet. The sofit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. Is it possible that the vent pipe is plugged? Or is the distance it is pushing air to the vent too long? I have the same set up in another bathroom, but it is closer to the soffit (about 6-7 ft) and there isn’t any problem with paint peeling. Thanks for your input. Reply
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Venting A Bathroom

I have a soffit ventilated bathroom exhaust fan that doesn’t seem to be venting the moist air out of the bathroom. I am having problems with paint peeling in the bathroom. The distance from the fan to where the vent pipe attaches to the soffit is about 12 feet. The sofit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. Is it possible that the vent pipe is plugged? Or is the distance it is pushing air to the vent too long? I have the same set up in another bathroom, but it is closer to the soffit (about 6-7 ft) and there isn’t any problem with paint peeling. Thanks for your input. Reply
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Venting A Bathroom

This article series describes how to install bathroom ventilation systems, fans, ducts, terminations. We include bathroom venting code citations and the text also explains why bathroom vent fans are needed and describes good bath vent fan choices, necessary fan capacity, and good bath vent fan and vent-duct installation details. We discuss bathroom exhaust vent codes, specifications, advice.
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Venting A Bathroom

I have a soffit ventilated bathroom exhaust fan that doesn’t seem to be venting the moist air out of the bathroom. I am having problems with paint peeling in the bathroom. The distance from the fan to where the vent pipe attaches to the soffit is about 12 feet. The sofit has holes in it, so I do not have a separate round soffit vent. Is it possible that the vent pipe is plugged? Or is the distance it is pushing air to the vent too long? I have the same set up in another bathroom, but it is closer to the soffit (about 6-7 ft) and there isn’t any problem with paint peeling.
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Bathroom exhaust fans perform an important function by removing excess moisture from your home. When venting a bathroom exhaust fan, make sure to vent the air to the outside, rather than into your attic where it can cause mold and mildew to form.
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be made from inflexible metal, PVC, or other rigid material. Unlike dryer exhaust vents, they should not droop; and have smooth interiors. Ridges will encourage vapor to condense, allowing water to back-flow into the exhaust fan or leak through joints onto vulnerable surfaces.Above all else, a bathroom ventilation fan should be connected to a duct capable of venting water vapor and odors into the outdoors. Mold growth within the bathroom or attic is a clear indication of improper ventilation that must be corrected in order to avoid structural decay and respiratory health issues.
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No bathroom plumbing system is complete without ventilation. When you flush the commode or drain the tub, wastewater pushes the existing air in the pipes and can form a water lock if additional air does alleviate the vacuum effect. You have a few options for venting the bathroom group, some easier than others, but they must all meet local building codes. Standard plumbing works on a gravity-flow system, with wastewater exiting through sloped pipes and air filtering in through vent pipes.
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Vent exhaust fans through a roof hood Roof vent hood details The best exhaust fan venting is through smooth, rigid ducts with taped joints and screwed to a special vent hood. Although this isn’t always possible in attic crawl spaces, you should always insulate the duct to prevent condensation problems. You can find 4-in. duct already wrapped in insulation at home centers. If you’re tempted to vent your exhaust fan through an existing roof vent, or even vent it into the attic, don’t do it. First, you’ll partially block your roof vent with the piping, reducing the flow of cooling air through your attic. Second, during cold winters, you’ll be blowing warm, moist air onto a cold surface (the roof vent and roof plywood). The water will condense and drip into the insulation below and perhaps into the house. Special bathroom fan roof vents with an internal damper that opens only when the fan is blowing will send moist air outdoors and keep cold air out of the house. Installing a Vent Hood on the Roof Start in the attic and drill a hole through the roof in the desired vent location. Try to keep it close to the fan location. Leave the drill bit sticking through the roof so you can find the hole. From up on the roof, use a jigsaw or reciprocating saw to cut a 4-in. round hole. Next, measure out a square slightly larger than the protruding part of the vent. Remove the asphalt shingles with a hook blade fitted into a utility knife. Gently pry up the shingles around the hole, making room for the vent to slide under the first course. Apply a bead of asphalt roof cement on the bottom of the vent. Slide the vent under the shingles so they cover the top half of the vent flange. The lower half of the flange sits on top of the shingles. Nail the lower corners with roofing nails and tar the heads. Placing the vent Sealing the vent Back to Top
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1920s bungalow with an upstairs dormer bathroom addition in Georgia. We just failed the HVAC inspection because the ceiling exhaust fan is “too close to the window” (about two feet away). Venting isn’t the issue, vents straight out through the roof. The inspector just cites the location. Unfortunately, there isn’t another place to install the fan without completely rearranging the space (including redoing the plumbing). Our contractor claims he’s never heard of this rule and suggests we challenge it. I can’t find any code referencing location requirements of an exhaust fan prohibiting installation near a window. Any thoughts?

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