Transgender Bathroom Bill

Transgender Bathroom Bill

Members of the transgender community take part in a rally on the steps of the Texas Capitol on Monday, March 6, 2017, in Austin, Texas. The group is opposing a “bathroom bill” that would require people to use public bathrooms and restrooms that correspond with the sex on their birth certificate. Eric Gay / AP Texas and Arkansas both advanced North Carolina-style “bathroom bills” on Wednesday that target the transgender community. In a 21-10 vote largely along party lines, the Texas Senate passed S.B. 6, or the “Privacy Protection Act.” The bill would require people to use bathrooms that correspond with the sex on their birth certificate, as opposed to their gender identity, in public schools, universities and government buildings. “I will tell you as a woman, this is not a joke. This is about dressing rooms, lockers, showers and restrooms. This is about privacy and protection for all people,” Republican Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, the bill’s primary sponsor, said during a debate on Tuesday. Mara Keisling, executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality, assailed the bill in a statement sent to NBC Out. “By voting this bill through, the Texas Senate has officially declared that the 125,000 transgender adults and thousands of trans children who live in Texas are second-class citizens,” Keisling said. “Trans people in Texas have it hard enough. These legislators are supposed to help their constituents, not add to the struggles they already face. We urge representatives in the House to do the right thing for all Texans and vote against this discriminatory bill.” The bill, which has been opposed by several big businesses and sports leagues, still faces obstacles to becoming law. Notably, Republican House Speaker Joe Straus has repeatedly denounced the proposal as bad for business. Republican Governor Greg Abbott hasn’t taken a clear public stance on the bill. Related: North Carolina’s Newest LGBTQ Lawmaker Fights to Repeal HB2 ‘Bathroom Bill’ In neighboring Arkansas, a Senate committee moved closer Wednesday to approving Senate Bill 774, or the “Arkansas Physical Privacy and Safety Act.” The proposal would require people in public schools and government buildings to use bathrooms and locker rooms that correspond their birth gender. “No child should have to worry that their school might change its policy to force them to shower or undress in front of a member of the opposite sex as has been the case around the country,” Republican Sen. Linda Collins-Smith, who introduced the legislation, said in a statement. The Human Rights Campaign (HRC), the nation’s largest LGBTQ rights organization, took a firm stand against the proposal. “Simply put, S.B. 774 targets transgender Arkansans just because of who they are. HRC Arkansas opposes any bill that singles out LGBTQ Arkansans for discrimination, and, laudably, so does Gov. Asa Hutchinson,” Kendra R. Johnson, state director of HRC Arkansas, said in a statement emailed to NBC Out. “Arkansas should learn from the mistake North Carolina made with its disastrous HB2 law, and reject this discriminatory measure.” HRC also has its eye on a similar proposal in Tennessee, according to a spokesman for the organization. Tennessee lawmaker Mark Pody indicated he plans to reintroduce a controversial “bathroom bill” later this session, according to The Tennessean. Follow NBC Out on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram
transgender bathroom bill 1

Transgender Bathroom Bill

STATE AND LOCAL North Carolina transgender 'bathroom bill' flushed by lawmakers Published March 30, 2017 Fox News Facebook0 Twitter0 Email Print North Carolina’s controversial “bathroom bill,” which limited people to the public restroom aligned with their gender at birth and prompted a backlash that threatened to hurt the state’s economy, was revamped by lawmakers Thursday after a year of contentiousness. The law sparked a rash of concert, sporting event and business convention boycotts and cost the state millions in revenue. A compromise plan announced Wednesday night by the state’s Democratic governor and leaders of the Republican-controlled legislature was worked out amid pressure from the NCAA, which threatened to take away more sporting events. The deal, which Gov. Roy Cooper urged lawmakers to support, repeals the portion of the year-old law that ties public bathroom use to the gender listed on one’s birth certificate. The new measure leaves policy on public restrooms to state legislators — not local government or school officials. The compromise deal drew criticism from transgender rights activists who say it still denies them protection from discrimination. It remains to be seen if the deal will satisfy the NCAA and other groups that have steered clear of the Tar Heel state in protest. Republican Sen. Dan Bishop, a primary sponsor of the original law, denounced the new deal on the Senate floor, where it was approved 32-16, with nine of 15 Democrats among the yes votes. “This bill is at best a punt. At worst it is a betrayal of principle,” the Charlotte-area legislator said. The House passed the bill 70-48 later in the day. Republican Rep. Scott Stone, who lives in Charlotte, urged his colleagues to vote for the bill. “We are impeding the growth in our revenue, in our ability to do more things for tourism, for teacher pay, while we have this stigma hanging over,” Stone said. “The time has come for us to get out from under the national spotlight for negative things. You can’t go anywhere on this planet without somebody knowing what is HB2 and having some perception about it.” Under the new law, local governments can’t pass new nondiscrimination protections for workplaces, hotels and restaurants until December 2020. That moratorium, according to GOP House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger, would allow time for pending federal litigation over transgender issues to play out. “This is a significant compromise from all sides on an issue that has been discussed and discussed and discussed in North Carolina for a long period of time,” Berger said. “It is something that I think satisfies some people, dissatisfied some people, but I think it’s a good thing for North Carolina.” Gay rights activists blasted the proposal, saying it was not a true repeal. “It doesn’t matter if you are a Democrat or a Republican, if you vote for this bill, you are not a friend of the LGBT community,” Equality North Carolina Executive Director Chris Sgro said. “You are not standing on the right side of the moral arc of history or with the civil rights community.” The deal came as the NCAA said North Carolina wouldn’t be considered for championship events from 2018 to 2022 unless HB2 was changed. The sports governing body said it would start making decisions on host cities this week and announce them in April. An Associated Press analysis this week found that the law would cost the state more than $3.76 billion in lost business over a dozen years. HB2 supporters argued that the law was needed to preserve people’s privacy. The Associated Press contributed to this report
transgender bathroom bill 2

Transgender Bathroom Bill

Critics of bills which exclude transgender individuals from restrooms which conform to their gender identity argue that they do not make public restrooms any safer for cisgender (non-transgender) people, and that they make public restrooms less safe for both transgender people and gender non-conforming cisgender people. Additionally, critics claim there have been no cases of a transgender person attacking a cisgender person in a public restroom, although there have been isolated incidents.. Transgender people have been verbally, physically, and sexually harassed or attacked by cisgender people in public facilities.
transgender bathroom bill 3

Transgender Bathroom Bill

In addition to these bills, an anti-transgender group has filed I-1552, a ballot initiative targeting transgender people. This ballot initiative would force transgender students into restrooms that don’t match their gender identity. It would also create a special carve-out in the state’s nondiscrimination law allowing anti-transgender discrimination in restrooms, as well as prohibit local governments from adopting transgender-inclusive policies. If the group pushing this ballot measure gets enough signatures by July 7, Washington residents will vote on it in an upcoming election.
transgender bathroom bill 4

Transgender Bathroom Bill

In early 2015, SB 6548, which would prevent transgender individuals from using the bathroom associated with the gender with which they identify was introduced in the senate but failed to pass. In December 2015, Washington State’s Human Rights Commission enacted a rule that allowed transgender individuals to use bathrooms conforming with their gender identities. Early in 2016, a bill to overturn the ruling (SB 6443) was voted on in the state Senate, and defeated by a margin of 25-24. An attempt to put a state voter initiative on the November 2016 ballot, I-1515, failed to reach the number of signatures necessary to appear on the ballot. On December 5, 2016, a new bill, HB 1011 was pre-filed in the Washington State House. This bill would prevent transgender individuals from using a bathroom of their gender identity unless they have had sex-reassignment surgery, and would prevent local municipalities from enacting ordinances contradicting the directive.
transgender bathroom bill 5

Transgender Bathroom Bill

North Carolina’s controversial “bathroom bill,” which limited people to the public restroom aligned with their gender at birth and prompted a backlash that threatened to hurt the state’s economy, was revamped by lawmakers Thursday after a year of contentiousness. The law sparked a rash of concert, sporting event and business convention boycotts and cost the state millions in revenue. A compromise plan announced Wednesday night by the state’s Democratic governor and leaders of the Republican-controlled legislature was worked out amid pressure from the NCAA, which threatened to take away more sporting events. The deal, which Gov. Roy Cooper urged lawmakers to support, repeals the portion of the year-old law that ties public bathroom use to the gender listed on one’s birth certificate. The new measure leaves policy on public restrooms to state legislators — not local government or school officials. The compromise deal drew criticism from transgender rights activists who say it still denies them protection from discrimination. It remains to be seen if the deal will satisfy the NCAA and other groups that have steered clear of the Tar Heel state in protest. Republican Sen. Dan Bishop, a primary sponsor of the original law, denounced the new deal on the Senate floor, where it was approved 32-16, with nine of 15 Democrats among the yes votes. “This bill is at best a punt. At worst it is a betrayal of principle,” the Charlotte-area legislator said. The House passed the bill 70-48 later in the day. Republican Rep. Scott Stone, who lives in Charlotte, urged his colleagues to vote for the bill. “We are impeding the growth in our revenue, in our ability to do more things for tourism, for teacher pay, while we have this stigma hanging over,” Stone said. “The time has come for us to get out from under the national spotlight for negative things. You can’t go anywhere on this planet without somebody knowing what is HB2 and having some perception about it.” Under the new law, local governments can’t pass new nondiscrimination protections for workplaces, hotels and restaurants until December 2020. That moratorium, according to GOP House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger, would allow time for pending federal litigation over transgender issues to play out. “This is a significant compromise from all sides on an issue that has been discussed and discussed and discussed in North Carolina for a long period of time,” Berger said. “It is something that I think satisfies some people, dissatisfied some people, but I think it’s a good thing for North Carolina.” Gay rights activists blasted the proposal, saying it was not a true repeal. “It doesn’t matter if you are a Democrat or a Republican, if you vote for this bill, you are not a friend of the LGBT community,” Equality North Carolina Executive Director Chris Sgro said. “You are not standing on the right side of the moral arc of history or with the civil rights community.” The deal came as the NCAA said North Carolina wouldn’t be considered for championship events from 2018 to 2022 unless HB2 was changed. The sports governing body said it would start making decisions on host cities this week and announce them in April. An Associated Press analysis this week found that the law would cost the state more than $3.76 billion in lost business over a dozen years. HB2 supporters argued that the law was needed to preserve people’s privacy. The Associated Press contributed to this report

Transgender Bathroom Bill

Transgender Bathroom Bill

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *