Tile Flooring Living Room

Tile Flooring Living Room

Stain-Resistant Porcelain “Porcelain is always a more popular choice than natural stone for the kitchen because it’s impervious to spills,” says James Brooks, owner of Floor Coverings International. When it comes to color and style, James considers the cabinets and countertops. “Look for a neutral tile without high shade variation to tie everything in the room together.” And to be safe, pick a grout color a shade or two darker than you think you want — it will hide inevitable stains better. Photo courtesy of Photo courtesy of Mannington Durable Slate-Look Porcelain “A laundry room or mudroom is going to get knocked around, so you want something strong,” says Joseph Jovinelli, VP at FLOORMAX. But homeowners also want to keep things casual or rustic in there, too. The solution is slate-look porcelain, which, he says “looks almost indistinguishable” from natural stone, but is impervious to moisture. Given the vibration of the washing machine and dryer, Joseph says that extra care and attention need to be given to preparation and installation. Photo courtesy of Mannington Small Mosaic Tiles A small room means using small tile, says Joseph, who points to mosaics as the hot trend in bathrooms right now. Tiles of one inch and smaller are much easier to install in a small room compared to a large one, even coming as they do on 12″ x 12″ sheets. In addition to their spectacular appearance, mosaics are a practical choice in moisture-prone baths because smaller tiles mean more grout lines and traction. Photo courtesy of AlysEdwards Vinyl Tile The additional weight of tile flooring can become a structural issue in some areas of the home, explains Joseph, but that is definitely not the case in the basement, which has the most stable subsurface of the entire structure. That gives a homeowner the freedom to choose large, heavy tiles that may not work elsewhere. For basements that double as rec rooms, he suggests wood-look porcelain tile. “It gives you that relaxed bar look,” he says, but with the durability and moisture resistance of ceramic. Wait up to a year before installing basement tile to give the house a chance to fully settle. Photo courtesy of Photo courtesy of Mannington Oversized Travertine Tile While not common in bedrooms on a top floor due to load, noise and instability of subfloor, tile is a popular choice for ranch-style homes in the hot Southwest, says James. “Throughout the Southwest, you see really beautiful travertine or natural stone flooring throughout the house, including the bedrooms,” he says. “Natural stone has a cooler feel under foot.” And in climates that experience some seasonal chill, stone works great with radiant heating because it maintains and distributes the heat better than wood. Photo courtesy of Inalco Stone-Like Porcelain What can be a better pairing than a wine cellar and Italian cobblestone? A cobblestone that won’t permanently be stained by every drop of wine. James suggests passing on the natural stone in favor of stone-look porcelain. You get all the charm of an Old World grotto with all the chip and moisture protection of hard-wearing ceramic. If the house is a new construction, he says it’s crucial to allow the slab to fully cure before laying the tile. Photo courtesy of Mannington Natural Stone Tiles “Because natural stone comes from nature it can withstand the elements,” says Joseph. That makes it a great choice for outdoor flooring like walkways, outdoor kitchens or around the pool. While almost any natural stone can withstand the elements, slate often is preferred over choices like travertine or marble because of its texture, which is less slippery. Though stone can survive drastic temperature swings, grout cannot. Those who live in chilly climates will have to swap out the typical mortar for cement or dry gravel. Design by Jamie Durie From: Jamie Durie Slip-Resistant Slate Entryways are more prone to temperature extremes than almost any other room. They also take the most abuse and you can see why durable tile edges out wood, vinyl and carpet when it comes to practicality. James suggests natural products like slate. “Slate has natural color variations that will hide wet or muddy prints, especially when combined with darker grout lines.” It also boasts a textured surface that reduces the risk of slips and falls. Photo courtesy of Tile Bend Oregon
tile flooring living room 1

Tile Flooring Living Room

I am getting rid of the horrible pet-stained carpet in my living room and am considering replacing it with tile. Is this a completely crazy idea? I currently have wood laminate in the kitchen/dining area, which flows into the living room. It’s still in reasonably good shape. Originally I thought I’d just do the living room in the same laminate, but the color and brand have been discontinued and I do not want a so-so match (and I am told that so-so is as good as it can get). Putting another shade and grain of laminate next to the current one looks wrong, hence the tile solution. A friend is adamantly opposed and says it will look horrible because tile is for bathrooms and kitchens. It’s none of her business, I know, but it’s giving me pause. I’m not particularly skilled at interior decorating and would prefer my living room not be fugly or strange. Your thoughts? posted by Wordwoman to Home & Garden (48 answers total) 2 users marked this as a favorite
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Tile Flooring Living Room

Tile is not common where i live in Northern VA however for pet reasons similar to yours we went with wood look tile and it has been AMAZING. everyone thinks it is wood flooring (trick is to use narrow grouting and dark dark grout) and it beautiful. i love it so much. if you are worried about the cold you can do heated tile. the best decision we ever made. If you want the tile that looks like real wood, you need to expect to pay at least $4.50/sq ft. Don’t go with that crap from home depot or lowes- go for long plank, narrow tile.posted by TestamentToGrace at 6:55 AM on November 21, 2013
tile flooring living room 3

Tile Flooring Living Room

Some tile designs are so beautiful, they must be on ‘display’, and what’s a better display than the flooring surface. Creating a tile centerpiece on your room floor could be a risky idea but if done right it can make your interiors totally unique. With this selection, we wanted to introduce some of the latest, the most exquisite and the most beautiful tile flooring ideas. Some designs we’ve picked are mesmerizing but all are definitely admirable. Read on for inspiration and room designs.
tile flooring living room 4

Tile Flooring Living Room

We had brick floors in my childhood home in Louisiana. My grandparents in the same town did, too. Brick is not tile, but if many people in my very traditional hometown had non-wood and non-carpet living room floor options, so can you. That said if you are going to do this, you should go with the nicest and most real/authentic/traditional tile you can afford. Also probably look at photos of houses with tiled living areas and model yours after one you like, as opposed to just going to Home Depot and picking any old thing. Your living room will look like a bathroom if you pick out bathroom-looking tile. I think that even if you live in a cold region, this could work well with lots of nice rugs.posted by Sara C. at 3:12 PM on November 20, 2013
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Tile Flooring Living Room

A lot of people in the Southwest do terracotta flooring and it’s gorgeous. If I lived in Colorado I’d consider installing radiant heat underneath, as others have mentioned. You might look up some examples of different styles of tile flooring and see what might work with your aesthetic though. Terracotta flooring in a big open Southwestern house with simple furniture is great, it would look stupid in a Victorian house. But there are options and options. Alternatively, one thing we considered when talking about replacing a section of flooring in one of our houses, was going with a totally contrasting laminate–we had light wood everywhere and we considered doing very dark wood laminate in the section that needed replacement. I think it would have looked fantastic, although we ended up going for a less expensive fix since we were selling the house soon.posted by padraigin at 7:28 PM on November 20, 2013
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Tile Flooring Living Room

If you are in Colorado I would not tile. People there don’t avoid tile just because of resale value; they avoid it because it isn’t so practical with Colorado weather. And, if you tile and then realize you too find it too cold in the winter, it is really a pain to undo. I empathize with your pet problem – i too have abandoned carpeting except for easy to wash throw rugs. My solution was Ikea’s bamboo flooring with some extra coats of poly on top. Inexpensive, puddle proof (poly and quick attention do the trick) doesn’t look bad with some scratches and dents, spot repairable (extra boards and/or sanding) and is different looking enough from wood that it “goes” with everything. I’ve had mine in for 5+ years and it’s still working well. And if I want to replace it for some reason, it would take me less than an hour to get back to the bare floor. So, no tile, but decent bamboo floor would be my recommendation. Then put poly on it.posted by dness2 at 3:37 PM on November 20, 2013

Tile Flooring Living Room

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